Thursday, May 18, 2017

Mother's Day






 

A pretty day to plant a Mother's Day hydrangea with Poppy (garden supervisor) and my friend Savannah.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

our new gardener

Poppy, aka Captain Judy Muffinhead
It's a beautiful spring day in Boise.

After a brief inspection of the perimeter, our yard supervisor took to the shade. Her folded front paw indicates she's thinking about things.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

buddy, the neighborhood McCaw

Buddy could live to be 80 years
On my walk this afternoon, I made a new friend. Buddy is a Catalina McCaw, 19 years old with a vocabulary of more than 75 words. He loves Cheetos, burgers and ice cream, and to watch football and golf on the 55" TV in his room. From Sesame Street he learned his colors and how to count.

He's afraid of spiders and snakes. When he was watching the nature channel and saw an anaconda, he shrieked, "Help me! Help me!"


This is why I carry a pen and notebook in my pocket.

Monday, April 24, 2017

SCBWI authors in Boise

1st, a peek at headlines
Tess Hilmo and I with fellow book lovers

An enthusiastic audience of readers and writers, and panel of authors met last Friday at Rediscovered Books, in downtown Boise. Owner Laura DeLaney hosted with great questions, sharing her own passion about children's literature. The evening was part of the conference at Boise State University, sponsored by the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI).

With Amy Allgeyer, Neysa Jensen, Tess Hart Hilmo, Leslie Patricelli, Wendy McClure, Elisabeth McKettal Gloria Skurzynski Alane Ferguson Sarah Tregay

Bookstore owner, Laura DeLaney, describes her love of children's literature

Thursday, April 6, 2017

sidewalk wisdom

During a lovely walk downtown Boise yesterday afternoon, I came upon this chalked message on 9th Street:

"When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced.
Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice. -- Indian saying"


Friday, March 24, 2017

family emergency = plea for health care

In the emergency room six months ago, my husband and I learned he had suffered an "R-Triple A": Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. His first response: "I want a second opinion." The surgeon shook his head. "Buddy, you don't have time for a second opinion. You're going to die in thirty minutes. If you have surgery you might survive, but there's only a 5% chance." 
I'm writing this today for three reasons:
1 -- The insidious debate about health care in the United States. What Speaker of the House Paul Ryan proposes is scurrilous. Millions of Americans will be forced to chose between seeing a doctor and putting food on the table. People will die.
2 -- In the ER that dreadful night, my husband asked for a second opinion because he worried this medical emergency would bankrupt our family. I foolishly had driven him to the hospital instead of calling 911. Ambulances are expensive.
3 -- I recently found my ER notes, jotted in between calls and texts with our sons, and questions to the medical staff. I'd begun a list of stuff used, to double-check against our future bill, having experienced double charges in past care: "...nausea meds, painkillers, IV, barf bag, cotton swabs, urine container, "robe", blood tests..." 
      Looking back I see a frantic couple married 35 years, terrified of losing each other but more so, terrified of the financial hit. We are fortunate and grateful. A skilled surgeon, Dr. Christopher Alessi, saved my husband's life.
     Short of having a single-payer health care system, we need the ACA to be improved and expanded, not repealed.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Ada, the neighborhood elk, her bittersweet story

Idaho cares about wildlife. I love this bittersweet story.

Feb. 27, behind Boise Co-Op
From Sitka Koloski re Ada the elderly elk:
"Ada was blocking traffic so the BPD were trying to feed her and give her water and she drank once but couldn't hold it down or leave the road so they sent traffic around her waiting for F&G to come assess. She was bleeding out both ends and went down on her own and was just at the end of her life so F&G put her down to end her suffering at this irreversible point where her digestive system shut down and they took her to the foothills since not diseased. Feeding her clearly just eased her final days. All positive and caring."
Boise Northend, Fort Street